Jane Hirshfield on Grief and Poetry

At NPR, Jane Hirshfield gives an interview about poetry and discusses a poem she wrote about grief. The poem is "Two Linen Handkerchiefs:"
How can you have been dead twelve years
and these still
Hirshfield discusses why she wrote the poem and how poetry about grief can be comforting to some readers.
The poem is broken off in exactly the way a life is broken off, in exactly the way grief breaks off, takes us beyond any possible capacity for words to speak. And yet it also, short as it is, holds all of our bewilderment in the face of death. How is it that these inanimate handkerchiefs — which did belong to my father and are still in a drawer of mine, and which I did accidentally come across — how can they still be so pristinely ironed and clean and existent when the person who chose them and used them and wore them is gone? ...
I think compassion, in a way, is one of the most important things poems do for me, and I trust do for other people. They allow us to feel how shared our fates are. If a person reads this poem when they're inside their own most immediate loss, they immediately — I hope — feel themselves accompanied. Someone else has been here. Someone else has felt what I felt. And, you know, we know this in our minds, but that's very different from being accompanied by the words of a poem, which are not ideas but are experiences.
Listen to the full interview